How to do rendering faster?

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spacee

How to do rendering faster?

Post by spacee »

I would like to know if there are anything in my system which is slowing the rendering proccess down. Is there would be a fairly cheap way to optimize the speed of this proccess?

My computer Spec.

Dell Dimension 8400
Intel P4, 3200 MHz
1 GB RAM
Geforce 6800, 256MB RAM
80GB HD, 7200 RPM

I am not complaning, because it is a decent computer and overall then things are working fine ... however I do have a lot of rendering work to do so if there is a easy way to improve it I really would like to know ... Thanks :)

Henrik
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Post by Ron P. »

Hi Spacee,

Short answer, I don't know..

To determine if there are some applications/programs or utilities that could be slowing the rendering process, we would have to know what you have installed.
Antivirus, Firewall, Instant Messengers, Spyware/Adware, Indexing Services, are some that can slow down the process.
A program that runs in the background, of course is using some CPU resources, which naturally take away from your video editing program.

So as you stated you have a lot of editing to do, I would suggest that the only programs you should have installed is those specifically needed for video editing. If you peruse this forum you should see some, which are recent, posts that the pros have a dedicated machine setup for video editing. Nothing else but essential video programs. Not every one has that luxury of multiple computers, I don't, but if you do then that is the way to proceed. It certainly would eliminate most of the problems...

Hope that helps...

_______

Happy Holidays, Merry Christmas :)
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Post by Ken Berry »

You also don't tell us an important piece of information: what speed is your machine currently rendering at; or to put it another way, what factor of real time is involved -- if you have, say, an hour's project you are converting/rendering, does it take close to an hour to render, or an hour and a half, or two or three or even four? Any of these are possibles and the longer times are certainly not outside the range of the 'normal' depending on the computer involved. Another factor which will significantly increase your rendering times is whether (in VS9 only) you have selected two-pass encoding...

But I would say that, with your set-up, anything much longer than twice real time might be a cause not only for annoyance and boredom, but concern. My system (see details under system button below) will normally convert at anything from about 1.2 to 1.5 times real time, depending on how many titles, transitions, voice-overs etc I have added. And your system should in theory be performing a degree better than mine.
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Post by sjj1805 »

Vidoman posted
Not every one has that luxury of multiple computers
There are a number of methods you can use to achieve this with just one computer. The benefits of these methods are that you are not taking up any more physical space in your home/office/workplace. You can have a "computer" dedicated to video editing, another "Computer" dedicted to playing games etc.

1. Purchase a Second Hard Drive.
Install this into your computer and temporarily remove the power supply to your exisiting Hard Drive. Now install your operating system.

You can now restore the power to your exisiting hard drive.
Use the System BIOS to choose which hard drive to boot from.
This method allows you to have completely independant systems but able to read the other hard drive.

An alternatative is to leave the power supply turned on to your exisiting hard drive but install your operating system to the new hard drive.
If you are using Windows XP, when you boot up your computer you will get a menu asking you which hard drive you wish to boot from.

In my humble opinion this is not as effective as the first method because the new hard drive is dependant upon the presence of the existing hard drive even if only for the boot menu.

A third option is to install Hard Drive Caddies. These fit into your computer in much the same was as your DVD Recorder, in one of the slots at the front of the computer. They are reasonably cheap to buy.
Your hard drive fits inside a small box which then slides into the caddy and is held in place with a lock. You can now have a collection of hard drives that can each have a copy of your operating system.

It is then a simple matter of turning your computer off. unlocking the hard drive caddy with a key, sliding out the hard drive and sliding in another.

2. Partition your exisiting hard Drive.
If you are unable to install a second hard drive for any reason then you can get hold of a program that splits your exisiting hard drive into two or more (pretending) hard drives. One such program is "Partition Magic" though there are plenty of others about.
http://www.powerquest.com/home_homeoffi ... index.html

You can now install a second copy of your operating system on another partition in the same way as "option 2" above where you will get a boot menu asking you which partition to boot from.

These methods will enable you to effectively have more than one computer, each designed for a different task. You could then set up a video editing machine that is not running any other unecessary programs which may be slowing your computer down.

Another benefit of a second hard drive multi boot system is that if for any reason you cannot get your computer to start, you can start it with one of your other hard drives and hopefully retrieve your important data.
Last edited by sjj1805 on Fri Dec 30, 2005 5:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by rguthrie »

Henrik,

There's a method known as creating a Hardware Profile. With this you can choose, when your computer boots, which profile you want to use. With a Hardware Profile you can turn off hardware that you don't need for video editing, such as your Ethernet Card, essentially your internet connection which, if you have DSL, is always on. This is supposed to help free up some resources that get used.

Let me look up the information again and I'll get back to you.

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Post by rguthrie »

Henrik,


I found the information, but here are some other recommendations that I'll make first:

1. Ensure that you defrag your harddrive often, especially if you do a lot of work such as capturing video, deleting video files etc. Before you defrg though clear out any files you don't need by following these steps"

a. Go to All Programs/Accessories/System Tools/Disk Cleanup and use it to delete your internet files etc.

b. Go to Explorer and go to Documents and Settings/Your_UserName/Local Settings/Temp and delete any files there.

:!: If you do not see this folder click Tools on the menu bar, Folder Options... select the View tab and select the radio button for Hidden files and folders to Show hidden files and folders and select OK.

NOTE: There will be a file or two that looks something like ~DF771.tmp that has the current date. This is a system file that you can't delete so don't worry about it. Also the letters and numbers will be different than what I showed; it changes each day.

c. Go to Windows/Temp and delete any files there. There will be one or two files there that end with .TMP that you can't delete either (again a temporary system file) but they're only 1KB big.

d. Go to C:/Temp if you have one and delete any files you have there.

e. Now defrag your hard drive.

2. It's a good idea to always leave at least 15% of your harddrive free. If you get below that Windows will complain when you defrag. Plus you probably will notice a performance hit.

3. Ensure that your Virtual Memory setting is 1.5 times your memory. I think Ulead actually recommends 2 times your memory. Look in the User Manual. To set your virtual memory press WIN+Break; click on the Advanced tab; click Settings under Performance; click the Advanced tab; go to Virtual Memory and click Change; select the radio button for Custom Size and make your Initial Size and Maximum Size the same then click Set. So if you use Ulead's recommendation that would be 2000. Make sure that select Set before you select OK. If I remember correctly you'll be told that you'll need to reboot for the settings to take affect.

Hardcore Gamers also look to tweak their systems for max performance so the site for how to create a Hardware Profile is http://www.technobabble.com.au/technoba ... aming1.htm. If you do a Google search on Hardware Profile for Gaming Machine I'm sure you'll find other resources as well. Hardware that you may consider disabling under your new hardware profile would be your network card(s) (which means no internet), modem, printer, and extra CD drive (but not your DVD writer).

If you do decide to create a hardware profile, once you've rebooted into that profile and disable your selected hardware devices you may also want to think about keeping some software programs from starting up. To do so, press WIN+R, type msconfig and select OK, go to the Startup Tab and here you'll see a list of program's that you may want to not have startup such as iTunesHelper, qttask, realsched, your antivirus software and your firewall (which you won't need since you're not connected to the internet), etc.

Finally, you can tweak your Display to use less resources by right-clicking on your desktop, select the Appearance tab, and change it to Windows Classic Style; then go to the Desktop tab and change background to None and press OK.

BTW, I personally don't use a hardware profile because with my system I'm getting about a 1 to 1 render time. :D

Hope this helps,
Ron G.
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All very good ideas

Post by ggrussell »

Several very good ideas. I would add to rguthrie's suggestion of a 'hardware profile' to also include a completely new user profile. That user uses only the specific hardware profile. You can also customize the user profile to only load specific background services, too.

I would think about a second hard drive. 80 gig isn't much. I have two 200gig hard drives. The second is dedicated to video ONLY.
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Post by Black Lab »

Those are some great ideas. May try a few myself! :lol:
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Post by rguthrie »

Here's a website that talks about XP's services if you're interested in also wanting to give a try to disabling unnecessary services (as per ggrussell's post): http://www.beemerworld.com/tips/servicesxp.htm

Also, like ggrussell I'd recommend that you get another HD. For video editing 80GB is small by today's standards.

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Post by sjj1805 »

Just created a Profile as per suggestion above.

Using the windows Task manager are here the comparisons

Video Editing Profile
processes 42
CPU 2%
PF 144 MB
With Media Studio 8 Video Editor opened
PF 215 MB


Normal profile
Processes 57
cpu 2%
PF 223 MB
With Media Studio 8 Video Editor opened
299 MB

In video Editing profile the flashing hard drive lights (showing the machine was still starting things up) after restarting Windows XP stopped a lot quicker than with the "Normal Profile"
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Post by rguthrie »

sjj1805,

Thanks for sharing your information! Have you tried rendering a video file yet to see if there are any performance gains?

Ron G.
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Post by sjj1805 »

Ron not yet, but when I get the chance I will let you know
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Post by sjj1805 »

rguthrie wrote:Here's a website that talks about XP's services if you're interested in also wanting to give a try to disabling unnecessary services (as per ggrussell's post): http://www.beemerworld.com/tips/servicesxp.htm
Ron G.
Thanks to Ron's link above I was able to tweak the Video Editing Profile I had created even further.
As a result of another entry on the same website
http://www.beemerworld.com/tips/disabledllcache.htm
I added the following to the registry
----------------------------------
REGEDIT4

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer]
"AlwaysUnloadDLL"=dword:00000001

----------------------------------

(Copy the above that is highlighted in blue between (but not including) the dotted lines and save as
unloadDLL.reg - then click the saved file to enter it into your registry)

Video Editing Profile
processes 31
CPU 2%
PF 116 MB
With Video Editor opened
PF 192 MB

Rendered a 4 minute video with Media Studio 8
Time taken to render = 3 min 30 seconds.
Closed Media Studio, checked Task manager and PF Usage was using
131MB

Normal profile
Processes 60
cpu 2%
PF 223 MB
With Video Editor opened
299 MB

Rendered the same 4 minute video with Media Studio 8
Time taken to render = 3 min 57 seconds.
Closed Media Studio, checked Task manager and PF Usage was using
240MB

So if I have calculated this correctly, the 27 seconds difference when rendering the same 4 minute video would equate to a saving of 6 minutes 45 seconds on a 1 hour video.

Steve J
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Post by rguthrie »

Steve,

Thanks again for sharing your information! If I remember correctly, your PC already rendered pretty darn fast so you may not see much of an improvement. It's hard to say what everyone will experience. There are so many different variables such as motherboards, front-side bus speed, HD, memory, etc., etc. I'm wondering though, you said
the same 4 minute video would equate to a saving of 6 minutes 45 seconds on a 1 hour video.
Would it be only 6 minutes, or might it actually exponentiate over time? Someday when I not as busy I guess I'll have to run some tests myself and see how they compare to your results.

Thanks again for your input,
Ron
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Post by Doug2006 »

This has been all really good information and if I may add one thing I have found. That is a program called BOOTITNG. This is a little $35 program that does everything that powerquest does for much less and more better. You can install it and partition your hard drive and have a dual boot option and also back up your system. I had powerquest and system commander and this beats them all. I was having trouble with all the video programs I had installed and my cpu usage would pop up to !00% when I just opened a program. So I just repartitioned and installed win2k again and only installed what I wanted and got rid of the problem. I also backed up the new install of win2k in about 4 minutes with bootit. Now any trouble and I can just go back to what was working. Also if you do decide to get this poke around their web site and make sure you get some added thing to fix DMA on drives. I got this as it was free with it and it speeded up my drives big time on the back time. I don't know yet if it makes a difference in Windows mode but it sure speeded up the drives in making backups which must be in a DOS mode or something. Any way check it out and I am not affiliated with them or get a cut or anything just a happy user. One problem also that I should mention is that I build my own computers so I get what I want and also I get the operating system. I suppose if you buy a compaque or Dell or what ever and you don't have the actual operating system than I don't know how you install a dual boot system? Doug