How should I go about doing 6 tapes of editing?

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nutsnbolts

How should I go about doing 6 tapes of editing?

Post by nutsnbolts »

I have 6 tapes (6 days) that overlaps with each other or so which I need to compile to one DVD. 2 hours of vacation video.

Should I do one day project at a time limiting it by 30 minutes each and then at the end, do one big project, importing all the videos and putting it together to make one big video?

Or.

Just use timeline linking in one project?

Which is more efficient?

I'm using MSP 8.
sjj1805
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Post by sjj1805 »

Although written for VideoStudio the contents of this link also apply to MediaStudio.
You will see in the tutorial how I dealt with a 2 week cruise.
http://forum.corel.com/EN/viewtopic.php?t=13421
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

Thanks, that link has some helpful tips.

On the other hand, I can't seem to find the 2 week cruise tutorial of how you dealt with it. Can you be more specific?
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

What I did was to create a seperate library for each "day" which being a cruise also meant a different location.
I imported all of my clips into the computer before commencing any editing - I have lots of Hard Drive space.
The I would treat each day/location as a seperate project and edit it separately. ech one could form a standalone video.
I then brought all of this together in the DVD authoring stage creating a set of 5 DVD disks all with a menu following the same common theme.
In fact I have DVD Menu pages of the contents of the other disks on each disk so that if I or someone else wanted to see, lets say Rome, I would know which DVD to insert.

You can then make a first play or intro video by taking small clips from each location.

Hope this helps.
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

ssj1805!

That's great. This is my first editing of a movie and I really don't know what I am going to encounter once I complete everything.

I know that for one thing, I'm starting of a huge task considering I'm looking to edit 6 tapes worth of editing.

Don't get me wrong, 6 tapes doesn't mean 6 different location. To the best, it's probably worth saying 6 different days with some overlapping days to prevent waste of a tape. I mean I was on vacation for 14 days, and 6 tapes of footage? Hrmph...definately doesn't add up. :roll: Furthermore, many footages are redundant. For instance, different shots of the leaning tower of pisa at different angles and different pan. Obviously, I won't be using all of the "pisa" footage but maybe a 2 or 3 of them to get the point across...Look there's Pisa! :lol:

Now, considering what you have done. I have 250 gigs of hd space on my secondary, 250 of external, 80 of main drive. I think I have enough to import everything. I have imported so far 3 tapes and basically going down the line of the tapes consecutively along with the days. For instance, I'm in Rome and a tape and a half or so is in Rome so I imported two of the tapes and started my edit there.

In my project tray > Media Bin I have imported the video with Split by Scene, so now I have several scenes which I also placed respectively in separate bins (Day 1, Day 2, etc.)

I'm presuming this is not what you did. To clarify, I'm presuming you created a new .dvp file with the imported video and created your editings from there and then once complete, you created another .dvp (project) and imported the video from there and so on...am I correct?

I'm still new at this so I'm still learning as we go. What do you do once you have created several projects with their respective editings? Do you create another project that puts everything together?

For instance, I envision a Fade-to-black with something saying, Day 1 Rome and Rome will play and then fade to black, Day 2. I'm presuming Day 2 would be on another project (.dvp)...

So many questions...
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
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motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

No two projects will be the same but we can adopt a structured workflow.
In your situation I would create in the media bin seperate folders for each item that can be treated as a seperate item.
You mention Pisa - that would be one.
Rome would be another etc.

Now treat the sets of clips for those locations as a seperate project when editing and make up a video dealing with just that location.

Less is best. By this I mean that several short clips are more interesting to the audience.
I was fortunate that I began my Video Hobby in the old days of a cine camera where you had 3 minute cassettes that were also expensive. You had to keep things short.

Now that we have Camcorders with tapes that can last a hour or more, it is too easy to just keep filming and filming and filming. On playback your audience (and even you yourself) will soon get bored. It is sometimes a bit heartbreaking to throw away things that have been filmed but essential in order to maintain interest.

Lets consider how we would deal with a wedding ceremony (Then use this sort of practice for your 6 holiday tapes). Perhaps a friend has asked you to video it for them.

Here you would split this up into
Project 1.
Arrival at Church. - Just include the arrival of the important players
Bride, Groom, Best Man, Bridesmaids, Page Boys, Parents of the couple. don't include all of the guests - it will get boring.
Ceremony. Bride coming down the aisle and then the wedding vows is enough.
After the ceremony Perhaps a pan across the congregation of visitors just so they can see themselves in your video. Throw in a slideshow of Still Pictures.

Project 2.
The Reception.
Similar to Project 1, arrival of the important participants of the event.
The Bride and Groom taking their places at the table.

A short clip mid meal of the guests (from a distance) eating - keep it short 10 seconds is more than enough.

After the dinner
Perhaps the speeches by the Bestman, Bride and Groom - depends upon how long the speeches last!

Perhaps this can then be rounded off with the compulsory "Come Dancing" competition that seems to follow these events.

O almost forget - the bride and groom leaving for their honeymoon.

What we have done here is to draw up a script and then matched our video footage to the script. You need to do the same with your holiday video.

Otherwise you will end up with something that made me laugh to myself at home last night.
My wife is a fan of that reality TV show Big Brother. She left the living room to make a cup of tea. One of my sons shouted out "Quick mom you're missing somehting he's just scratched his ear"

I popped my head round the door to see what he was referring to, there was this shot of a housemate sitting in the pool and yes - definate movement he was scratching his ear!
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

First off, thanks for your patience and answers.

1. So I understand this and we are on the same page, when you speak of projects, are you saying to create Pisa movie on one project then when complete, go to FILE > NEW to create another project for let's say, ROME. Essentially, I would have pisa.dvp,

2. How many hours can I fit onto 1 DVD?

3. I haven't done any authoring yet but I don't want to rip apart my video due to limitations of the authoring process? Any tips here or keep in mind?
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

You can do it without creating a new project.
have seperate bins for the videos for each mini-production.
Do all the editing for that production on the timeline then render an MPEG2 DVD compliant video.
Clear the timeline and do the next one.

What I did next with my 12 tapes created during a 16 day tour of California last year was, having created all of these videos, they were all obviously different sizes. A tape of the Universal Studios was huge, where a tape of a little cowboy town Calico would be small.

I then created an excel spreadsheet and listed all of my edited video clips and file sizes. From that (Taking into account an overhead for the actual DVD menu) I worked out how best to fit them onto a collection of DVD discs.

Most discs would probably have a couple of big files and then a few smaller ones to almost fill the disc. I ended up using a total of 5 DVD discs.

In addition to the 12 Video Tapes I had also taken some 4-500 still photographs with a digital camera. I used the same approach to create several slideshows. One of the 5 DVD discs contained just slideshows.

On another holiday - a two week cruise of the Mediteranean - a similar approach ended up with DVD discs that contained Videos and slideshows.

On that occaision I began a clip of an area - lets say Pisa with a slideshow of pictures taken from my digital camera - complete with a musical soundtrack, this then (with a transition) went into the video I had shot of that location. It worked well.

The important points are
1. Create a script.
2. Consider the most efficient means of creating a set of DVD discs.

If you need to fit a certain collection of videos/slideshows onto one particular disc then you can adjust the bit rates as per these suggested settings:
http://forum.corel.com/EN/viewtopic.php?p=56707#56707
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

As I stated before, I have never authored a DVD. I'm hoping as well that when I'm doing my first edit. (Almost done with Rome) I'm doing it correctly. In other words, format and everything, I chose DVD NTSC 29.9.. frames.

I have already outlined the script of how I'm going to do this which is day by day basic movie of what we did in the 14 days. I won't cover all 14 specifically but it will go consecutively.

When you stated that I can just use one project and then when one project is done, render is to MPEG2 DVD compliant video. What does this mean exactly? Also, I have rendered this "rome" clip as an MPEG to show my wife which works but I haven't gotten to that step yet where I am complete finish and satisfied with the end result of the "rome clip" so once I'm complete...

1. I'm presuming I'm rendering this as an MPEG (like what I did).

2. What if I want to go back to it and edit again once I complete the ENTIRE project...I may learn different techniques. Could I go back and make changes on the rendered files? Considering I'm deleting the timeline and continuing with the project on the same file.

3. What do you use for your authoring?

Once again, thank you for the link you gave me, I'm sure I will be stumbling this once I start creating the DVD.
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

So far everything I have suggested can be applied to either
VideoStudio or MediaStudio. Here is where there is a slight difference between the two products.

Using MediaStudio you have a choice between creating these project folders in either:
The Production Library.... or
The Project Tray.

Video Studio has a Library Manager that could be likened to the Production Library. I mention these differences because parts of this thread have become suitable for inclusion in one of the Forum Tutorials.

The main difference between the MediaStudio Production Library and the Project tray is that in computing terms the Production Library is Global but the Project tray is Local.

To explain this:
The (Global) Production Library contains any clips video, audio or still image that will appear in all projects. so if you start a new project, those clips will still be seen. The VideoStudio Library falls in this category.

The (Local) Project tray contains audio, video and still image clips that only appear in that project. Start a new project and those clips no longer appear. When users gain more experience using MediaStudio each user will develop their own favourite method of using these two options.

Items placed in the (Global) Production Library can of course be deleted manually. You also have a Save/Load option and so therefore you can keep items in the Production library. Save that part of the library.
Delete the Library but later load it back in again.

Dealing with a newbie I would suggest that the safest course of action is to initialy stick to the Global production library so that if you decide to quickly clear the timeline by starting a new project (There are other methods of clearing the timeline - I am looking here at what is 'safe' for a newbie) you don't lose all of the thumbnails you have generated by whatever means you generated them.

This would include items inserted by
Import Video file
split by Scene
Multi-trim
or any other method.

Regarding the point you made concerning
"I may wish to edit this project again at a later date"
You should save each project using File | Save.
If you clear the timeline and then start work on another sub-project
eg You've completed 'Rome' and now wish to do 'Pisa' then use
File | Save As
To alter the this projects name. You then have two project files on your computer, one named Rome the other named Pisa and you can then toggle between the two using
File | Open.

You can only have one project at a time open and so if you try to open the other you will be prompted to save the current one first.

Render to DVD Compliant MPEG2 file.
MPEG2 is the format that VOB files are made from. If you place a DVD disc in your DVD drive and view the contents with Windows Explorer you will find the following:
Folders named AUDIO_TS and VIDEO_TS.

The VIDEO_TS Folder will contain files named like this:
VIDEO_TS.BUP
VIDEO_TS.IFO
VIDEO_TS.VOB
VTS_01_0.BUP
VTS_01_0.IFO
VTS_01_1.VOB
VTS_01_2.VOB
VTS_02_0.BUP
VTS_02_0.IFO
VTS_02_1.VOB
VTS_02_2.VOB

The files ending VOB are basically MPEG2 files, the other named files are mostly instructions to the DVD player and DVD Menu files.

Not all MPEG2 files are DVD Compliant, some people do other things with their edited video files such as placing them on the internet.

Rendering is another name for creating.
You start off with a big video file then just as though it was made from old fashioned film you cut it up with scissors and throw bits away. You glue it all back together again with transitions, superimpose some sound and fancy titles.

When you render, you create a shiny new video made up from all those cuts and joins.

What do I use for authoring?
MediaStudio 8 comes equipped with DVD MovieFactory 4.
It is a cut down version of the standalone product MovieFactory 4 but is adequate for most people to use in order to author their DVD Menus.

You've probably guessed already that I am a serious hobbyist and so have purchased something that has a little more power - though it is in serious need of a service pack or new version to bring it up to date
DVD Workshop 2.
http://www.ulead.com/dws/runme.htm
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

Regarding the point you made concerning
"I may wish to edit this project again at a later date"
You should save each project using File | Save.
If you clear the timeline and then start work on another sub-project
eg You've completed 'Rome' and now wish to do 'Pisa' then use
File | Save As
To alter the this projects name. You then have two project files on your computer, one named Rome the other named Pisa and you can then toggle between the two using
File | Open.

You can only have one project at a time open and so if you try to open the other you will be prompted to save the current one first.
Focusing on this comment. This is probably the route I want to take, like I said, I'm green with this hobby and I don't know what I will face in the end whereby I may need to backtrack and improve on the previous projects.

Let's say once complete, I'm presuming I will be taking each project and starting a whole new project and importing each of them into it connecting each one of the .dvp's.

For example, I'm done with everything.

I create another project, Italy.dvp whereby I import all the videos (rendered), Rome, Pisa, etc. etc...

Taking into account the size of the DVD's, I would obviously import what fits leaving room for the menu.

Would this be correct?
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

Once you have rendered the individual videos as MPEGs you do not join them back together as one huge video. You keep them as separate videos.

Now open your authoring program such as MovieFactory or in my case DVD Workshop.

You then import those separate videos into the authoring program and they are all then added to your DVD Menus.

This way a user can select an individual video from the DVD Menu and
"Just watch Rome" or "Just watch Pisa" or they can choose to watch the entire contents of the DVD.

Any particularly long videos can be further sub-divided into 'Chapters'
This is the DVD terminology for a 'jump to' point.

Once you get into it you will have as much fun creating your DVD Menus as you have editing the videos. For a beginner there are plenty of ready made DVD Menus so you more or less simply tell the authoring program
"Here are my videos - create me a DVD."
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

Interesting!

I DID NOT KNOW THAT.

I thought you have to have the entire movie in one long movie file and when you author, you "bookmark" the locations beginning and end points for "chapters".

Separating it to different projects...I thought was just an easier smaller way of editing your video so that you don't get all confused.

Ok then, for the time being, I will focus on this. Once I start authoring, then I'm sure more questions will pop up!

THANK YOU VERY MUCH SJ1805!
nutsnbolts

Post by nutsnbolts »

Can the user have the option of watching the entire movie?

With transition fade to black to next location (which was created separately)?
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

You can enable a user to select an individual video to watch or the entire video.

If you want transitions between invidual videos this can be done if you are using the more expensive DVD Workshop and apply a bit of ingenuity.

As stated earlier you can have as much fun authoring the actual DVD Menu and 'Playlists' when using the more expensive DVD Workshop.

To see the capabilities of DVD Workshop please view
http://www.ulead.com/learning/dws.htm
The bottom of that page also contains some Tutorials in Video Format.
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