RAID configuration

ando775

RAID configuration

Post by ando775 »

Which RAID configuration is best suited for video, RAID 0 or RAID 1? What are the differences?
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Post by Devil »

It depends what you are wanting to do.
RAID 0 with 2 identical drives effectively combines them into one faster drive. In days of slower drives with high quality analogue capture at datarates exceeding 30 Mb/s, this was almost essential to avoid dropped frames. Today, it is less used because a) most users transfer DV to their hard disc and b) modern drives are fast enough to cater even for analogue capture. The downside is that the risk of disk problems is doubled, as one drive failure ruins everything.

RAID1 allows the data to be duplicated over 2 disks. I've never tried this.

I have a RAID controller card, but I now use it to drive two extra drives independently of each other.
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Post by sjj1805 »

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Post by htchien »

RAID 0 - combine 2 to 4 physical drives as 1 logical drive. This will let you get faster drive accessing speed and large logical drive capacity.

RAID 1 - duplicate all data from physical drive A to physical drive B for data safety (we call this Mirroring), usually used for server configuration. When PC is accessing data, it will access both drives. If 1 physical drive fails (for example, drive A), you can hot-swap the bad drive A with an new physical drive C without any data loss. After the hot-swap is done, RAID controller will duplicate (mirror) data from drive B to the new drive C.

Drives used in RAID 1 must be in same capacity.

Hot-swap means you can relpace some hardware devices without shutdown the system.

RAID 0+1 - you need 4 physical drives for this. 2 physical drives will be combined into a logical drive and the other 2 physical drives will be used for mirroring. Usually used for database servers.

To use which RAID mode would depend on your needs. IMHO I would think RAID 0 is OK. And if you are using Windows 2000 or Windows XP, you do not need to buy a RAID controller to do RAID 0. Windows 2000/XP has built-in software RAID controll system call Dynamic Disk System.

Hope this helps.

H.T.
Last edited by htchien on Fri May 12, 2006 1:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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jday

Post by jday »

The only additional point I want to make concerning RAID 0 is that since it does basically combine 2 different physical hard drives as one logical drive and gains it's speed by writing to both of them if one crashes you lose the data on both.
ando775

Post by ando775 »

Thanks for all the help everyone! :D
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Post by preacherallen1 »

I am also confused about raid.

I have an onboard controller for raid 0 on my motherboard. I also currently have 5 hard drives and 2 DVD drives on the computer (extra SATA card in one of the expansion slots so using 7 of the 8 available drivers). It would be good to mirror one of the drives because of value of data stored on it.

Can I use the onboard controller by itself, or will I still need to connect the two drives to a Hard drive controller also? In other words do I need to connect the RAID controller AND a Hard drive controller to each of the drives, or is the RAID controller by itself enough?

Allen
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Post by preacherallen1 »

Sorry,

I meant RAID 1 on the motherboard not RAID 0

Allen
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Post by Devil »

On some m/bs, the inbuilt RAID connections are separate from the ordinary HDD connections, at least for IDE. You therefore have 4 IDE ports, 2 of which may be configured for RAID. I understand some "ordinary" SATA ports can be configured in your BIOS for RAID, using the same connectors. There is therefore no cut-and-dried answer and you should find the one relative to your m/b in the board manual. The RAID drivers should be on the CD-ROM from the board maker.
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Post by preacherallen1 »

I think you have answered my question, but just to be sure. I have checked the RAID section on the MOBO manuel and it was not helpful. I realize I mistyped also. The controlers on the board are IDE. I know that MOBOs come with 4 IDE controlers and I have added 4 more with the card in the slot. That gives me 8 - 7 of which are currently in use. I also know that there is a separate dual wire connection on the MOBO marked RAID but only carries about a 4 wire connector on each of the two inputs. I would rather not use any of the 7 IDE connections I am currently using. Is the 4 wire RAID connector simply a "controller" and I also have to have the drives connected to the IDE controllers plug-ins to carry the actual data (need both RAID and IDE wires connected to each drive), or does the RAID connector actually carry the data (seems kind of small for that) and an IDE connection to the RAID drives will not be needed (only need the RAID wire plugged in to work)?

Allen
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Post by Devil »

Not knowing exactly how your m/b is set up, normally you have only two "standard" IDE ports and two RAID IDE ports, each of which can handle a master and a slave drive. I don't know of any that have eight ports. You plug two identical drives as master into the RAID IDE ports (or four identical ones as master and slave). There is NO other connection that I know of to the drives (nor would I know how they could be connected.. However, on some m/bs, you may need to enable the RAID chipset by putting a jumper on a couple of pins (or it may be done in the BIOS).

You must understand what the manual says: I can't telecommand you from here.
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Post by preacherallen1 »

Thanks for the information. What is marked RAID is definitely not an IDE plug in so I probably can't do what I wanted to do.

Allen
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Post by sjj1805 »

Purely out of curiosity, why do you wish to try a RAID configuration.
I have always been put off experimenting with these configurations because with my motherboard I have to install some software which appears on face value that it will alter my system BIOS.

I have therefore kept clear of RAID in case I then decided "its not for me" and then found I had made some permanent alteration to the BIOS.

I decided to stick to the "If it aint broke don't fix it" theory.
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Post by preacherallen1 »

I have about 150 gigs of graphics and sound files I have collected through the years for teaching the Bible (a little over 2,000,000). They are on one of my hard drives in files under topics and then I access them using ACDSee for adding to power point and now movies. The array is constantly being added to so I would have a hard time backing up just the files that are added. They could be backed up as a group and then added, but then should it ever fail I would have to spend weeks/months resorting all of them. When it was small I made a CD then DVD back up once every 6 months but that would take hours of work. I am currently using an external drive to back up over a USB 2 port (firewire keeps crashing on large transfers), but thought it might solve some of this to use a RAID 1 set up to make two copies of everything I add. I have a big enough power source in the computer to run two more Hard drives and thought if I could just use the thing marked RAID then I could accomplish this. You were probably right that it is jumpers although there is a set of two cables that came with the MOBO that fit the plug ins.

Allen
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Post by sjj1805 »

preacherallen1
Obviously a computer can be used for simply thousands of different reasons and so there are different configurations to suit different uses and needs. In your case I would use a RAID 1 configuration because in your situation having a complete back up is essential.

This would also be true of various industrial uses of computer systems.
Organisations like the Police Force hold millions of records which are being constantly updated 24 hours per day every day of the year. They would need a system that can be described as fitting RAID 1 - bearing in mind that we are now talking about mainframe computers, though the concept is the same.

The users of this forum are handling video DATA which is dynamic.
Due to the large files sizes involved - soon to get even larger with the new arrival of HDTV, BlueRay discs etc. I doubt many keep their video DATA on their hard drive for very long.

My workflow
1. Import Video Data.
2. Edit Video Data.
3. Author a DVD.
4. Delete Video DATA
5. Return to step 1.

RAID 0 might possibly be of some use to our forum members but this must be weighed against the risks of one drive fails then both drives have failed.

If your looking for a system of best use of multiple hard drives you may consider my workflow which involves 3 internal hard drives two of which have been subdivided into two partitions each and can be seen in this diagram.

Image
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