Creating a Video Editing Profile.

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sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

The safest course of action would be to use a non-administrator account.
If you find a certain program needs admin rights you can always use "Run As".

The reason for this suggestion is that even though you do not have the worry of an attack from the internet, persons entering your computer room can still gain access to your files and also make unauthorised changes to your computer. My experience of a computer bug is something about 6' tall weighing a 180 pounds and sitting in front of the keyboard!

This is not restricted to family/friends but you must also consider the implications of theft of your computer.
thad
Posts: 88
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2005 2:01 am

Post by thad »

The safest course of action would be to use a non-administrator account.
At the time I asked this, I was right in the middle of following the tutorial and decided at the time to give the new user account administrative rights. That being said, I have a few issues that I'm trying to work out.

When I started the tutorial, I had nothing in the Start up folders, so I skipped all appropriate steps in the Final Step: Edit the Startup menus and the Registry. I thought this was weird since I know Zone Alarm and Norton launch at startup. Why weren't they in the startup folder?

I thought everything went smooth while following the tutorial. Later, when I was using the new profile/user, certain programs acted as though they had never been run before. I had to change the default settings the way I liked, etc. Is this because I was a new user to these programs? I can see why different users may have different preferences/settings, but some programs required me to enter my registration code because Your demo expired 739 days ago and other programs wanted to be registered as if I just installed them. I thought that type of info would be carried out for any and all users. Isn't there a way to set it so all users have access to the same programs and settings?

I also noticed that my normal user no longer had Norton or Zone Alarm launch at startup. I must have botched that accidently. I was able to add them back in via the registry as you mentioned in Step 3. Add any items to the [current user run section] that were originally contained in the windows startup folder. Is that the right way to do it?

I tried to install a new program on my video editor user and I got an error saying that the Windows Installer service had not been started and it needed to be to install software. I checked my settings and it was enabled. I followed your exact guidlines from your Excel sheet on what services to enable/disable. On a similar note, when I open a MS Word document, a window pops up and attempts to go through an installing process. It just hangs and I have to Ctrl+Alt+Del to end task.

I'd appreciate any comments on the above issues. I know with a little help, I can get this worked out. I can't wait to get into my next project to compare some render times and such. Based on the numbers, I've doubled my speed/power since creating this new user. Thanks!

Thad
Using Video Studio Pro X2
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

Not everything starts with the Windows Start menu or the registry run sections. Some items start up as services (services.msc)

Try downloading and running Autoruns and this will show what programs, services and anything else run at startup and what causes them to run in the first place.

Regarding a new user and certain pieces of software quoting your demo expired 730 days ago and other like messages.
This is on a per program basis. Some software companies allow their purchased software to be used on a machine basis (all users) whilst other software companies alow their software to be run on an individual user basis and expect another fee for each additional user.

Many of the software companies that allow their software to be used on a per machine basis enable individuals to personalise their copy of the software. Take for example Microsoft Office - each user enters their own personal details. This is especially useful when using Microsoft Outlook where each member of a family (or organisation) will have their own address book, be able to check their own email independant of other family (or organisation) members.

Some software must be run once by a new user with Administrator rights - for example Microsoft World Atlas 1998 Edition. The easy thing to do here is when you create a new user - initially give the user admin rights, run each piece of software that this user will be given access to, once. Having completed this remove the user from the administrators group.
Thorarinn

Excellent advice

Post by Thorarinn »

Steve,

Excellent advice, thank you! Anyone having MSP8 crashing problems should try this - even before un-installing, re-installing, repairing XP installations etc.

I've been in IT a long time and thought I knew buggy software but I'm new to video editing and this seems to put a different kind of strain on your system.

Turn off any and all hardware and services/software not required and there's a good chance you'll start enjoying your video editing!

Cheers,

Thorarinn
Mitch Hurricane

Hum, something's wrong

Post by Mitch Hurricane »

Ok,

I went through most of this with no problems, just follow along and it's pretty basic. However, after I created the new account "video editor" and went to use that account, in that account, I have no more fav. list in explorer (no way of reading the tutorial) and 50% of the programs that show up when I'm in he HP admin account are gone. (Photoshop etc..) Do I have to somehow reload these programs so that the new user account has access to them?

The screen res is different as well.

Did I miss something?

Thanks,

Mitch
Mitch Hurricane

i think i got it

Post by Mitch Hurricane »

ok, after rereading some of the above posts, i think i figured out what happened.

I'll let everyone know if anything else causes my brain to freeze up..heh heh
Mitch Hurricane

alrighty then...more questions

Post by Mitch Hurricane »

Ok, I can run Photoshop in the new user account , but the files I'd like to use with it are no where to be found. How can I access those files? They do show up in the original user account.

Thanks ,

Mitch
heinz-oz

Post by heinz-oz »

That is because, when you initially installed Win and created your first user account, you made all the files and folders private. I have never had to share my PC with anyone else and don't really know if you can reverse that in your original account.

I found this out the hard way, when I had to reformat my system drive and start with a fresh install. All my documents were on a different HDD and I though I was safe. Turned out that, even though I used the same username for the admin account, I could not access the old files, that tought me never to make my folders private again. Since then I have no such problem and my video editing profile gives me access to everything and the other account can run all programs also.
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

Theoretically the correct way to set up an NT/XP computer is to have an Administrator account which has full access to everything.

The Administrator account is used to install new programs, the Administrator also sets up any security levels, options and users.

The Administrator should also create himself a standard USER account and should log onto the USER account for day to day use of the computer.
This is to prevent the machine from being tampered with by
1. Connections from the internet
2. Someone sitting at the keyboard.

Some programs will only run correctly if they have been run by a USER who has been given temporary administrator privileges at least once.
One program that springs to mind is Microsoft World Atlas 1998 Edition.
Once a USER run the program once, the USER can be taken back out of the Admins Group.

A correctly set up machine is in a sense like it is a different computer dependant upon who has logged on. Some software programs are machine based and once purchased and a serial number entered, all users of that machine can access the program.

Some pieces of software are USER based. A serial number must be purchased by each individual USER that wishes to use a piece of software.

Some machine based software behaves as though it is specific to a certain USER. Take for example Microsoft Office. If you open Microsoft Outlook as your email program then you will find Your address book, emails and calendar and so on. When another USER logs on that person will find they have their address book, emails, calendar and so on.

Each individual USER will have their own desktop and can choose their own wallpaper and desktop icons. Some Desktop icons are common to all users.

If you look in C:\documents and settings
you will then see separate folders for
Administrator
All Users
Each Individual User.

If you log on as Administrator you can copy/paste entries from one USER folder to another. This will include files that hold various software settings such as your internet favourites.
gordonwd
Posts: 121
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2004 9:15 pm

Post by gordonwd »

This is a great article, and I set my PC up this way last night. One thing that you might consider adding has to do with the fact that, if you have been using VS in your original account for a while, you will of course find that the library and other customizations are set back to their initial state in the new user account.

You can copy your previous customizations by copying the files from the Application Data section of your old personal folders to your new account. I am at work right now, but I think that the files can be found in a path something like:

"Documents and Settings\<account name>\Application Data\Ulead Products\VideoStudio\10.0" (or 9.0 or whatever your version is). Copy the files and subdirectories from the version-specific directory to the equivalent directory in your new user account, overwriting what was previously there. Your library contents and other stuff will be restored.
Phil S
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 10:34 am
operating_system: Windows 7 Home Premium
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 64 Bit
motherboard: Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD3R v1.6
processor: QuadCore Intel Core i7 2933 MHz
ram: 6gb
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce 210
sound_card: Realtek High Definition Audio
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1640gb
Location: London

Post by Phil S »

OK - I've done this and these are my results:

Before:
Processes = 24
Commit Charge = 200M
Physical Memory Available = 737752K
Time to Render 4min 32sec video = 9min 45sec

After:
Processes = 12
Commit Charge = 81M
Physical Memory Available = 833880K
Time to render same video = 9min 30sec

Not very spectacular on saved render time = 15 secs.
However it's something and I shall still keep the Video Editing profile as someone suggested that it might cut out the screen freezes and glitches that I've had on one or two of the larger Videos that I have produced.

Thanks for the good article Steve, at the very least I've learnt all about profiles, processes and user accounts.
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

Phil S wrote:OK - I've done this and these are my results:

Before:
Processes = 24
Commit Charge = 200M
Physical Memory Available = 737752K
Time to Render 4min 32sec video = 9min 45sec

After:
Processes = 12
Commit Charge = 81M
Physical Memory Available = 833880K
Time to render same video = 9min 30sec

Not very spectacular on saved render time = 15 secs.
........
You shaved 15 seconds of a 4 and half minute video, now imagine doing a whole hour or two! Another factor that needs to be taken into account is the complexity of the video being rendered.

Compare the savings of a 4 and half minute video containing little or no editing to one with lots of cuts, transitions, titles, picture in picture effects, sound effects, stretches, zooms and so on.
Phil S
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2005 10:34 am
operating_system: Windows 7 Home Premium
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 64 Bit
motherboard: Gigabyte GA-EX58-UD3R v1.6
processor: QuadCore Intel Core i7 2933 MHz
ram: 6gb
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce 210
sound_card: Realtek High Definition Audio
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1640gb
Location: London

Post by Phil S »

Yes this 4 minute vidoe was full AVI, JPG, WMA music, titles, transitions, Zoom and Pan effects etc. PAL 16:9, VBR 6000 with 5.1 sound.

I am going to make a few changes to a 1.5 hour project (which took 2.5 hours to render) I completed to DVD last week and render and burn again. As I said I did get a few glitches in that (couple of small gaps in the sound track) so it will be interesting to see if they happen again using the new profile.

Based on my results above it should save around 4 minutes of render time.

Setting this profile is well worth doing for both a saving, reliability and the knowledge gained in doing it. Win all round really.
wontonpe

Post by wontonpe »

How much of this can I do with XP Home & how do I save the registry before starting? - I have never edited the registry (on purpose). I am little scared, but after having to reformat and reinstall XP now twice on my new HDD, I am learning a lot, so I guess I am willing to go for it. I can always reformat and begin again, right?

This seems like a great idea in any case, thanks for sharing. :)
sjj1805
Posts: 14419
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2005 7:20 am
operating_system: Windows XP Pro
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 32 Bit
motherboard: Equium P200-178
processor: Intel Pentium Dual-Core Processor T2080
ram: 2 GB
Video Card: Intel 945 Express
sound_card: Intel GMA 950
Hard_Drive_Capacity: 1160 GB
Location: Birmingham UK

Post by sjj1805 »

With XP Home Edition you should be able to do everything in my initial post with the exception of :
Step 5. If you have Xp Pro alter the security setting of the [all user run section] to read only.
This is because Home Edition does not permit you to make the same security settings that the Pro Edition allows you to.

The Home Edition is as the name implies targeted at the Home User
The Pro Edition is aimed at the Business user where the Company can 'lock down' their computers to prevent alterations to the computers by members of the company workforce.

I also use the Security Settings to create on my personal computer at home
user accounts for my grandchildren and a niece. This then allows me to let them use my computer for school work without my having to watch over their shoulder.
Locked