Output Sound Quality

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SebastianL1987
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue May 13, 2014 4:43 pm
operating_system: Windows 7 Professional
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motherboard: Biostar TZ77XE4
processor: Intel Core i7 3770K
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Video Card: 2 x Geforce GTX660 in SLI
sound_card: Creative SB ZxR
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Monitor/Display Make & Model: Samsung T27B300 EW/EN

Output Sound Quality

Post by SebastianL1987 »

Dear,


I would like to get more information about the sound quality that goes out of WinDVD Pro 11.

I understand that DTS-HD master audio from a blu-ray movie is 96Khz/24 bit.

If I check the info when I play a movie is says 48Khz/24bit.

Does PowerDVD 11 Pro downgrade the audio of the blu-ray if I use it with a analog connection ?

My system and sound card support 96Khz/24 bit sound output.


Thank you

Sebastian
Last edited by SebastianL1987 on Thu May 15, 2014 12:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
DVDDoug
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Re: Output Sound Quality

Post by DVDDoug »

I don't know, but DTS-HD has a regular (lossy) DTS component and a correction component that allows lossless decoding.

All Blu-Ray players (and player software) can play all of the formats, but they are not required to play them all losslessly.

Wikipedia says:
Combined lossless/lossy compression.

When played back on devices which do not support the Master Audio or High Resolution extension, it degrades to a "core" track which is lossy.[5]

According to the DTS-HD White Paper,[6] DTS-HD Master Audio contains 2 data streams: the original DTS core stream and the additional "residual" stream which contains the "difference" between the original signal and the lossy compression DTS core stream. The audio signal is split into two paths at the input to the encoder. One path goes to the core encoder for backwards compatibility and is then decoded. The other path compares the original audio to the decoded core signal and generates residuals, which are data over and above what the core contains that is needed to restore the original audio as bit-for-bit identical to the original. The residual data is then encoded by a lossless encoder and packed together with the core. The decoding process is simply the reverse.
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SebastianL1987
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue May 13, 2014 4:43 pm
operating_system: Windows 7 Professional
System_Drive: C
32bit or 64bit: 64 Bit
motherboard: Biostar TZ77XE4
processor: Intel Core i7 3770K
ram: 8GB
Video Card: 2 x Geforce GTX660 in SLI
sound_card: Creative SB ZxR
Hard_Drive_Capacity: +-1256 GB
Monitor/Display Make & Model: Samsung T27B300 EW/EN

Re: Output Sound Quality

Post by SebastianL1987 »

Yes, I know that. I took a look at the dolby website and they state that 96Khz/24 bit is the maximum BUT if it is used is a other question. So the 48Khz/24 bit I get to see in the menu under information is the sound on the blu-ray and if I set windows to 96Khz/24 bit the sound from the blu-ray should get upmixed by my sound card or am I wrong ?
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