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Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby Rhopman1986 » Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:01 pm

Hello,

Like many others I also did receive a couple of upgrade mails for Corel Video Studio 2019. (However none of the new features that Corel is advertising with is something that I need. Especially not for almost the full price)

The only thing that I am wondering:
How is hardware acceleration with rendering and playback in 2019 in comparison with 2018? Is there better support for multi core CPU's and Nvidia GPU's?
I mean, the new AMD and Intel CPU's are now on consumer level and all have 8 cores. Is Corel aware of this?

The problem now is that I have a 9700k CPU , and I barely notice any difference in exporting my video project in comparison with my old 4790k which is 5 years older. (Both were running with the same GTX 1080ti)
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby ispyisail » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:08 am

Have a look at davinci resolve

Videostudio still does lots of stuff better but for power editing try davinci resolve
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby iNate » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:05 pm

Well, that's not unexpected:

1. Same GPU, so you aren't gaining anything in terms of Graphics Processing for Effects.
2. QSV in 9th Gen isn't really a massive jump in performance over QSV in Haswell. I'd argue Intel has been relatively stagnant here, in comparison to Nvidia and AMD.
3. Same NVENC, so you wont gain anything in terms of HEVC Encode Performance… cause you didn't upgrade the GPU.

Because VideoStudio uses QSV Decoding and QSV/NVENC Encoding, and you haven't upgraded the GPU, you aren't likely to see massive improvements in performance. Other NLEs do a lot more with the CPU, and have a lot more "Pro-Level" things going on over the hood (Color Science, Optical Flow, etc.), so upgrading the CPU has a much bigger benefit there. They also tend to be better multithreaded than consumer NLEs. Upgrading the CPU won't make the GPU render frames with effects any faster :-P

Most time spent rendering video is spent Rendering Frames, not encoding it, in consumer NLEs … because they all use QSV/NVENC/VCE for Encode Acceleration.

Resolve is better than VideoStudio in literally every way, but you need the $299 Studio License to get Hardware Accelerated Decode/Encode and support for Rendering HEVC, among other things. Most people from here are completely bullied by its learning curve, so I don't tend to recommend it much. VEGAS Movie Studio Platinum and MAGIX Movie Edit Pro Plus are probably more apt recommendations.
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby ispyisail » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:40 pm

but you need the $299 Studio License to get Hardware Accelerated Decode/Encode and support for Rendering HEVC


There is much discussion about this on the internet.

Free vs paid

I think the free version is much better than your statement indicates for power editing. (Just an opinion based on usage)
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby iNate » Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:25 am

There is nothing to discuss on the internet about this. Blackmagic Design has been blatantly clear about how Resolve Free Differs from Studio in this aspect:

1. The Playback Engine in Resolve Studio has higher performance than that in the Free Version, on Windows (written by BMD Developers on their forums).
2. Free version does not support QSV or NVDEC/NVENC Encoding/Decode for H.264/HEVC on Windows. You also cannot render to HEVC on Windows without the Studio License - a big deal if you have larger projects at higher resolutions that you want to upload to sites like YouTube or Vimeo.
3. Resolve[Free] does not support 10-Bit Media.
4. A number of useful ResolveFX (Noise Reduction, Face Refinement, etc.) are restricted to Studio, and you can't really make up for it with free packages like NewBlueFX Prime and Ignite Express (Except maybe Lens Flares and stuff in Ignite).
5. Optical Flow-based Time Remapping is not in Resolve Free; though this isn't a big deal, as VSP is not technologically that advanced (the Free version's Time Remapping is still better than VideoStudio's).

Resolve does support OpenFX and VST Plug-In Architecture, so it's possible to make up for some of the limitations with 3rd party plug-ins, but you'll be paying a lot more for tools that are much cheaper to get simply by upgrading to Resolve Studio ;-)

The free version is better than every Consumer and Prosumer NLE on the market... easily. The limitatiosn are moreso to get professionals to pay up. Things like face refinement are unlikely to be things the average VideoStudio user finds of great utility (and you can get a lower level Face Refining OpenFX from NewBlueFX for free, anyways).

However, if you record exclusively in H.264, and *especially* HEVC, then you want Studio. Otherwise you are going to have to Optimize all of your media for decent performance, as Resolve "Free" does not use HWA for Decode or Encode. If your GPU/CPU is weak, you will have to Render cache a lot. This requires a lot of drive space for larger projects, render caching can bottleneck editing performance until it's complete (until it's complete, preview performance won't be good).

Resolve has really high system requirements. It does all image processing on the GPU. With a 1080Ti, this is not an issue, but people with 1050s and 1060s will run into problems, especially when working with 4K/UHD media. It needs a lot of VRAM to function, and a lot of CPU RAM, as well. 16GB is really a minimum requirement if you actually plan to edit with it a lot. 32GB is really needed if you want to start incorporating Fusion. An 8GB+ GPU is needed if you want to do more aggressive grades, noise reduction, etc. For UHD, a 4GB GPU is the bare minimum. 2GB for Full HD, but I'd get at least a 3-4GB GPU for that, as well...

I didn't say it was any less good than it is. Only that I don't recommend it to *most* people here, because I have in the past and it ended up being either:

1. Too high a learning curve for them (based on feedback I've gotten from most of them, in private messages). A lot of lower end users have no interest in growing their proficiency with more complicated solutions, which unfortunately does nothing but further corner them into the lower-end of the market :-(

2. Requires too much hardware power, which many people on this forums cannot provide it. A lot of people using VSP are on Laptops or Desktops with older/weaker CPUs and weaker GPU; so you have to be care with how you recommend Resolve. The people on those forums do not take kindly to low end users asking questions about performance, stability, etc. when their machines are obviously too weak to use the software ;-)

Subreddits are full of people who are desperate to use Resolve, but simply can't because they don't have the hardware to run a usable editing system with it... It's workstation class software - built to scale to dozens of CPU cores and multiple high end GPUs, etc. It used to cost thousandS of dollars. The price was lowered to iMovie/Final Cut Pro X level to compete with the likes of Avid, Adobe, and Apple.

P.S. You cannot get full screen playback on a second screen with resolve without a BMD card. I think they start at ~$120. Without that, it will not work.

P.P.S. Power Editing is nothing more than a useless regurgitation of the term "Power User" in verb form. You can be a power user of VideoStudio - meaning you are not simply a basic user... but use a to of the programs more advanced functionality. You can actually do a lot with the consumer editors. The issue almost all of them have is their awful Track Layouts and Timeline editing in comparison to more Pro-Oriented editors - they also typically have very illogical and inefficient keyboard mappings... It's 500% harder to make frame-accurate cuts in software like VideoStudio compared to something like VEGAS Pro, Avid, Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro X, or Resolve. The track layout makes synching audio to video very difficult. Audio Waveforms are hidden away. Keyframing is more difficult (exception being Pinnacle Studio). Transitions are oddly displayed on the screen. They don't handle Timecode as well. Most don't have OpenFX or VST Support. The default tech for things like Color Correction, Image Stabilization, and other effects tends to be weaker (which is why they rely on 3rd party effects bundles). They don't interop as well with other applications as higher end applications (i.e. Round Tripping to Wave Editors or DAWs, VFX Software, etc. - MAGIX being an exception, with their Media X-Change system between their Photo/Design, Music Maker, Movie Edit, Sound Cleaning Lab applications).

A lot of the same stuff is still possible in the consumer editors... It just takes more steps as the UX tends to revolve around clicking buttons and working in separate windows, than fast keyboard navigation and efficient panel docking. Some of the tech is not as high end, but it works for the target market. A good example of this is Time Remapping and Key Framing. A lot of this is done directly on the timeline in a much more efficient way in higher end NLEs than it is done in almost every consumer NLE. High end editors will use Optical Flow algorithms for this, which are much better than what you get in the average consumer editor.

You can "power edit" in anything. The limitation is the capabilities of the software. I think you're being diplomatic... Yes, Resolve Free is a thousand times better than VideoStudio… but for many VSP users, it's not a good recommendation. Just becaue someone games and has a 1080Ti doesn't mean they are ready or willing to deal with Resolve's complexity (or resulting performance limitations, cause it's absolutely tragic with VFR media... like game recordings from OBS and ShadowPlay).
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby ispyisail » Wed Feb 13, 2019 1:10 am

It think your reply is excellent and accurate

I was trying to say the same thing with less words

The free version is better than every Consumer and Prosumer NLE on the market... easily.


The free version (and paid) is very usable just the leaning curve is high.

Videostudio tends to be point and click and davinci resolve you need to learn many short cut keys. (over simplified)
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby 1jhill » Sat Feb 16, 2019 3:10 am

iNate wrote:There is nothing to discuss on the internet about this. Blackmagic Design has been blatantly clear about how Resolve Free Differs from Studio in this aspect:

1. The Playback Engine in Resolve Studio has higher performance than that in the Free Version, on Windows (written by BMD Developers on their forums).
2. Free version does not support QSV or NVDEC/NVENC Encoding/Decode for H.264/HEVC on Windows. You also cannot render to HEVC on Windows without the Studio License - a big deal if you have larger projects at higher resolutions that you want to upload to sites like YouTube or Vimeo.
3. Resolve[Free] does not support 10-Bit Media.
4. A number of useful ResolveFX (Noise Reduction, Face Refinement, etc.) are restricted to Studio, and you can't really make up for it with free packages like NewBlueFX Prime and Ignite Express (Except maybe Lens Flares and stuff in Ignite).
5. Optical Flow-based Time Remapping is not in Resolve Free; though this isn't a big deal, as VSP is not technologically that advanced (the Free version's Time Remapping is still better than VideoStudio's).

Resolve does support OpenFX and VST Plug-In Architecture, so it's possible to make up for some of the limitations with 3rd party plug-ins, but you'll be paying a lot more for tools that are much cheaper to get simply by upgrading to Resolve Studio ;-)

The free version is better than every Consumer and Prosumer NLE on the market... easily. The limitatiosn are moreso to get professionals to pay up. Things like face refinement are unlikely to be things the average VideoStudio user finds of great utility (and you can get a lower level Face Refining OpenFX from NewBlueFX for free, anyways).

However, if you record exclusively in H.264, and *especially* HEVC, then you want Studio. Otherwise you are going to have to Optimize all of your media for decent performance, as Resolve "Free" does not use HWA for Decode or Encode. If your GPU/CPU is weak, you will have to Render cache a lot. This requires a lot of drive space for larger projects, render caching can bottleneck editing performance until it's complete (until it's complete, preview performance won't be good).

Resolve has really high system requirements. It does all image processing on the GPU. With a 1080Ti, this is not an issue, but people with 1050s and 1060s will run into problems, especially when working with 4K/UHD media. It needs a lot of VRAM to function, and a lot of CPU RAM, as well. 16GB is really a minimum requirement if you actually plan to edit with it a lot. 32GB is really needed if you want to start incorporating Fusion. An 8GB+ GPU is needed if you want to do more aggressive grades, noise reduction, etc. For UHD, a 4GB GPU is the bare minimum. 2GB for Full HD, but I'd get at least a 3-4GB GPU for that, as well...

I didn't say it was any less good than it is. Only that I don't recommend it to *most* people here, because I have in the past and it ended up being either:

1. Too high a learning curve for them (based on feedback I've gotten from most of them, in private messages). A lot of lower end users have no interest in growing their proficiency with more complicated solutions, which unfortunately does nothing but further corner them into the lower-end of the market :-(

2. Requires too much hardware power, which many people on this forums cannot provide it. A lot of people using VSP are on Laptops or Desktops with older/weaker CPUs and weaker GPU; so you have to be care with how you recommend Resolve. The people on those forums do not take kindly to low end users asking questions about performance, stability, etc. when their machines are obviously too weak to use the software ;-)

Subreddits are full of people who are desperate to use Resolve, but simply can't because they don't have the hardware to run a usable editing system with it... It's workstation class software - built to scale to dozens of CPU cores and multiple high end GPUs, etc. It used to cost thousandS of dollars. The price was lowered to iMovie/Final Cut Pro X level to compete with the likes of Avid, Adobe, and Apple.

P.S. You cannot get full screen playback on a second screen with resolve without a BMD card. I think they start at ~$120. Without that, it will not work.

P.P.S. Power Editing is nothing more than a useless regurgitation of the term "Power User" in verb form. You can be a power user of VideoStudio - meaning you are not simply a basic user... but use a to of the programs more advanced functionality. You can actually do a lot with the consumer editors. The issue almost all of them have is their awful Track Layouts and Timeline editing in comparison to more Pro-Oriented editors - they also typically have very illogical and inefficient keyboard mappings... It's 500% harder to make frame-accurate cuts in software like VideoStudio compared to something like VEGAS Pro, Avid, Premiere Pro, Final Cut Pro X, or Resolve. The track layout makes synching audio to video very difficult. Audio Waveforms are hidden away. Keyframing is more difficult (exception being Pinnacle Studio). Transitions are oddly displayed on the screen. They don't handle Timecode as well. Most don't have OpenFX or VST Support. The default tech for things like Color Correction, Image Stabilization, and other effects tends to be weaker (which is why they rely on 3rd party effects bundles). They don't interop as well with other applications as higher end applications (i.e. Round Tripping to Wave Editors or DAWs, VFX Software, etc. - MAGIX being an exception, with their Media X-Change system between their Photo/Design, Music Maker, Movie Edit, Sound Cleaning Lab applications).

A lot of the same stuff is still possible in the consumer editors... It just takes more steps as the UX tends to revolve around clicking buttons and working in separate windows, than fast keyboard navigation and efficient panel docking. Some of the tech is not as high end, but it works for the target market. A good example of this is Time Remapping and Key Framing. A lot of this is done directly on the timeline in a much more efficient way in higher end NLEs than it is done in almost every consumer NLE. High end editors will use Optical Flow algorithms for this, which are much better than what you get in the average consumer editor.

You can "power edit" in anything. The limitation is the capabilities of the software. I think you're being diplomatic... Yes, Resolve Free is a thousand times better than VideoStudio… but for many VSP users, it's not a good recommendation. Just becaue someone games and has a 1080Ti doesn't mean they are ready or willing to deal with Resolve's complexity (or resulting performance limitations, cause it's absolutely tragic with VFR media... like game recordings from OBS and ShadowPlay).



This is about the best break down for resolve from a power user/pc builder but complete ignorant on video editing suites as I’ve seen. I fully get the programs potential and spent hours watching YouTube tutorials on how to do stuff and some of its features like the ability to change an items color without effecting any other color in the video is really really cool and I can absolutely see the use for it (like my GoPro always showing bright reds and an orange and I can’t fix it). But in the end the program is just too much for me and my use and just find myself having to watch a tutorial all over again every time I try to use it or do any particular thing because it isn’t something I use daily as a professional would. So that and also the fact it kept bugging out on me on launch led me away from resolve. I didnt know the free version had no hardware decode either which makes sense now why it was choppy as hell for hvec.
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby 1jhill » Sat Feb 16, 2019 3:16 am

Oh and as to the original topic of hardware acceleration 2018 vs 2019. 2019 appears to be faster for me at least, 2018 was a huge disappointment as it only used one core of my i7 4790k to render video which I thought was completely unacceptable for a program written in 2018 (not like multi core cpu’s Is a new ground breaking technology). 2019 appears to be using the same engine as pinnacle studio and uses all 4 cores and 4 threads of my i7, sadly neither has OpenCL support so only Nvidia and Intel GPU support. I’m leaning more and more towards an RTX 2060 so not the end of the world but I still think it’s a poor decision to not support a standard that all three can use vs a specific code that only runs on certain hardware. If I’d known that at the time I may have gone with Vegas instead since it supports all and doesn’t limit my hardware choices.
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby iNate » Sat Feb 16, 2019 10:37 am

1jhill wrote:Oh and as to the original topic of hardware acceleration 2018 vs 2019. 2019 appears to be faster for me at least, 2018 was a huge disappointment as it only used one core of my i7 4790k to render video which I thought was completely unacceptable for a program written in 2018 (not like multi core cpu’s Is a new ground breaking technology). 2019 appears to be using the same engine as pinnacle studio and uses all 4 cores and 4 threads of my i7, sadly neither has OpenCL support so only Nvidia and Intel GPU support. I’m leaning more and more towards an RTX 2060 so not the end of the world but I still think it’s a poor decision to not support a standard that all three can use vs a specific code that only runs on certain hardware. If I’d known that at the time I may have gone with Vegas instead since it supports all and doesn’t limit my hardware choices.

I've never seen this behavior on VS2018. It used all cores on both my Intel and AMD machines while rendering. The rendering speed was very acceptable. Faster than VEGAS Pro, for example.
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby iNate » Sat Feb 16, 2019 10:46 am

1jhill wrote:

This is about the best break down for resolve from a power user/pc builder but complete ignorant on video editing suites as I’ve seen. I fully get the programs potential and spent hours watching YouTube tutorials on how to do stuff and some of its features like the ability to change an items color without effecting any other color in the video is really really cool and I can absolutely see the use for it (like my GoPro always showing bright reds and an orange and I can’t fix it). But in the end the program is just too much for me and my use and just find myself having to watch a tutorial all over again every time I try to use it or do any particular thing because it isn’t something I use daily as a professional would. So that and also the fact it kept bugging out on me on launch led me away from resolve. I didnt know the free version had no hardware decode either which makes sense now why it was choppy as hell for hvec.

1. Ignorant of video editing suites... how?

2. Color grading is one part of DaVinci Resolve... If you don't need the functionality, ignore it? What you're referring to is color correction, which can be accomplished just fine in VideoStudio using NewBlueFX Colorfast. You don't need VideoStudio 2019 to color correct or grade your footage, though the LUT input is nice (but ultimately useless without an intensity slider). Corel has been giving you the tools to do this for years, already. Most color correction plugins are "complicated," as color correction is highly technical. This is why consumer editors often omitted it completely. Consumers don't even have the hardware to accurately color correct, as most consumer desktop monitors and televisions are not color accurate. So, why harp over it? Resolve started off as a color grading solution, and this is why its feature set in that area is very deep... There is a current FAD around LOG footage that is seeping into the consumer market (i.e. Filmic Pro, etc.), which is why you see many people using that to sell it. It's also a bit overhyped because people are perpetually on the anti-Adobe bandwagon ;-)

3. The programs isn't really too much for anyone - no application is. People just feel like they need to learn everything and don't know how to pace the learning curve/process. No one wants to be a newb at anything, Lol. This leaves them feeling overwhelmed. As I've stated earlier... Ignore the functionality you don't need, just as you ignore all the extra plug-ins and applications that Corel gives you with VideoStudio Ultimate... until you need them. At the end of the day, adding Mercalli, ColorFast, Boris and NewBlueFX Titlers, VitaScene, etc. to VideoStudio creates an impressive and very formidable package of functionality with a high combined learning curve. This is only lessened because the functionality is broken up into different distinct products, and it's a lot easier to just ignore the extras, which makes the product seem more approachable. This is why consumer editors put functionality in windows, and not panels! Using Windows means that the application avoids displaying "too much" to the user, which lets it seem approachable, even though the feature set is really quite deep - and it is, even for VideoStudio. Resolve puts all of this functionality in one product, so and exposes a lot more of it up front. That is why it's a daunting product when moving up from something that seems less "complicated". It's not designed for newbies, or at least not those who look at a busy interface and decide it's not worth it :-P

4. Well, they're pretty up front about this. There is a feature comparison PDF and it's linked to from the product page. If you read the documentation, even the basic parts of it, you tend to be informed of these disparities :-P HEVC choppiness is solved by right clicking the clip and Optimizing the Media, which produces quality proxy files that edit with perfect frame accuracy and play back without frame drops (unless your PC is just.... too weak). With smart caching on, Resolve will render cache all of that to an Intermediate Format even without Proxies. Pinnacle Studio also does this! Resolve has one of the best User Manuals/References that I've ever encountered in the software market, and tons of free training material available both in PDF and Video Format, along with Gigabytes of Project Files and Example Media for you to download and follow along with.

The software is only "too much" and "too hard to learn" if you are unwilling to do so, which is your prerogative. Don't sell yourself short, though. They've done as much as anyone ever will to make this as painless and possible for you. It is not difficult.

Crawling around YouTube looking for random tutorials is actually the wrong way to go about it, IMO, given the resources they themselves have provided us.

BTW, nothing in your post displayed how I am "completely ignorant regarding video editing suites." Your first statement is actually a bit of an oxymoron. (You don't have to be a Power User or a PC builder to read and understand system requirements ;-) ).

P.S. HEVC is the absolute worst CODEC to edit directly, along with VP9. A good lesson to learn early is to just... not do it. No matter how many times we tell people to avoid doing it, they persist in doing so... Unfortunately. Transcode. HEVC is a massive waste of computing power that can be better spent on things like effects processing. It's meant for playback, not editing. Trying to do frame-accurate editing with Interframe CODECs is a massive PITA, VFR from smartphones, etc. is a massive PITA even in NLEs that say they are compatible with it. I'm not going to apologize for knowing a little bit more about these things than others. It's your choice whether or not you want to benefit from the knowledge others on this forum share with the community.

Lastly, you CLEARLY didn't read my entire post, because you're basically regurgitating something I've already stated, at the end of it:

Yes, Resolve Free is a thousand times better than VideoStudio… but for many VSP users, it's not a good recommendation. Just because someone games and has a 1080Ti doesn't mean they are ready or willing to deal with Resolve's complexity (or resulting performance limitations, cause it's absolutely tragic with VFR media... like game recordings from OBS and ShadowPlay).

If Resolve is "too much for you," then don't use it. I'm quite aware that it's "too much" for a lot of people, in their opinion. I do think people are a lot more capable than they often give themselves credit for, so I try to provide some motivation for them to push themselves beyond - and extend - their comfort zones.

I'm not really interested in marketing Resolve on this forum, frankly... I've given some reasons why one would want to avoid it in that same post. I simply believe that if you cower away form complexity, then you imprison yourself ever longer in simplicity. Power Users and PC Builders didn't gain literacy with technology by doing that, and I think increasing literacy with technology is within the capability of every human being on this forum.

For some users, VideoStudio is a first step. For others, it's their destination. You get to choose what it will be for yourself. I'm not interested in dictating your software use :-P
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby 1jhill » Sat Feb 16, 2019 1:05 pm

iNate wrote:
1jhill wrote:

This is about the best break down for resolve from a power user/pc builder but complete ignorant on video editing suites as I’ve seen. I fully get the programs potential and spent hours watching YouTube tutorials on how to do stuff and some of its features like the ability to change an items color without effecting any other color in the video is really really cool and I can absolutely see the use for it (like my GoPro always showing bright reds and an orange and I can’t fix it). But in the end the program is just too much for me and my use and just find myself having to watch a tutorial all over again every time I try to use it or do any particular thing because it isn’t something I use daily as a professional would. So that and also the fact it kept bugging out on me on launch led me away from resolve. I didnt know the free version had no hardware decode either which makes sense now why it was choppy as hell for hvec.

1. Ignorant of video editing suites... how?

2. Color grading is one part of DaVinci Resolve... If you don't need the functionality, ignore it? What you're referring to is color correction, which can be accomplished just fine in VideoStudio using NewBlueFX Colorfast. You don't need VideoStudio 2019 to color correct or grade your footage, though the LUT input is nice (but ultimately useless without an intensity slider). Corel has been giving you the tools to do this for years, already. Most color correction plugins are "complicated," as color correction is highly technical. This is why consumer editors often omitted it completely. Consumers don't even have the hardware to accurately color correct, as most consumer desktop monitors and televisions are not color accurate. So, why harp over it? Resolve started off as a color grading solution, and this is why its feature set in that area is very deep... There is a current FAD around LOG footage that is seeping into the consumer market (i.e. Filmic Pro, etc.), which is why you see many people using that to sell it. It's also a bit overhyped because people are perpetually on the anti-Adobe bandwagon ;-)

3. The programs isn't really too much for anyone - no application is. People just feel like they need to learn everything and don't know how to pace the learning curve/process. No one wants to be a newb at anything, Lol. This leaves them feeling overwhelmed. As I've stated earlier... Ignore the functionality you don't need, just as you ignore all the extra plug-ins and applications that Corel gives you with VideoStudio Ultimate... until you need them. At the end of the day, adding Mercalli, ColorFast, Boris and NewBlueFX Titlers, VitaScene, etc. to VideoStudio creates an impressive and very formidable package of functionality with a high combined learning curve. This is only lessened because the functionality is broken up into different distinct products, and it's a lot easier to just ignore the extras, which makes the product seem more approachable. This is why consumer editors put functionality in windows, and not panels! Using Windows means that the application avoids displaying "too much" to the user, which lets it seem approachable, even though the feature set is really quite deep - and it is, even for VideoStudio. Resolve puts all of this functionality in one product, so and exposes a lot more of it up front. That is why it's a daunting product when moving up from something that seems less "complicated". It's not designed for newbies, or at least not those who look at a busy interface and decide it's not worth it :-P

4. Well, they're pretty up front about this. There is a feature comparison PDF and it's linked to from the product page. If you read the documentation, even the basic parts of it, you tend to be informed of these disparities :-P HEVC choppiness is solved by right clicking the clip and Optimizing the Media, which produces quality proxy files that edit with perfect frame accuracy and play back without frame drops (unless your PC is just.... too weak). With smart caching on, Resolve will render cache all of that to an Intermediate Format even without Proxies. Pinnacle Studio also does this! Resolve has one of the best User Manuals/References that I've ever encountered in the software market, and tons of free training material available both in PDF and Video Format, along with Gigabytes of Project Files and Example Media for you to download and follow along with.

The software is only "too much" and "too hard to learn" if you are unwilling to do so, which is your prerogative. Don't sell yourself short, though. They've done as much as anyone ever will to make this as painless and possible for you. It is not difficult.

Crawling around YouTube looking for random tutorials is actually the wrong way to go about it, IMO, given the resources they themselves have provided us.

BTW, nothing in your post displayed how I am "completely ignorant regarding video editing suites." Your first statement is actually a bit of an oxymoron. (You don't have to be a Power User or a PC builder to read and understand system requirements ;-) ).

P.S. HEVC is the absolute worst CODEC to edit directly, along with VP9. A good lesson to learn early is to just... not do it. No matter how many times we tell people to avoid doing it, they persist in doing so... Unfortunately. Transcode. HEVC is a massive waste of computing power that can be better spent on things like effects processing. It's meant for playback, not editing. Trying to do frame-accurate editing with Interframe CODECs is a massive PITA, VFR from smartphones, etc. is a massive PITA even in NLEs that say they are compatible with it. I'm not going to apologize for knowing a little bit more about these things than others. It's your choice whether or not you want to benefit from the knowledge others on this forum share with the community.

Lastly, you CLEARLY didn't read my entire post, because you're basically regurgitating something I've already stated, at the end of it:

Yes, Resolve Free is a thousand times better than VideoStudio… but for many VSP users, it's not a good recommendation. Just because someone games and has a 1080Ti doesn't mean they are ready or willing to deal with Resolve's complexity (or resulting performance limitations, cause it's absolutely tragic with VFR media... like game recordings from OBS and ShadowPlay).

If Resolve is "too much for you," then don't use it. I'm quite aware that it's "too much" for a lot of people, in their opinion. I do think people are a lot more capable than they often give themselves credit for, so I try to provide some motivation for them to push themselves beyond - and extend - their comfort zones.

I'm not really interested in marketing Resolve on this forum, frankly... I've given some reasons why one would want to avoid it in that same post. I simply believe that if you cower away form complexity, then you imprison yourself ever longer in simplicity. Power Users and PC Builders didn't gain literacy with technology by doing that, and I think increasing literacy with technology is within the capability of every human being on this forum.

For some users, VideoStudio is a first step. For others, it's their destination. You get to choose what it will be for yourself. I'm not interested in dictating your software use :-P


You misunderstood what I meant. I didn’t mean you are ignorant of video editors I meant it as comping from me as the ignorant one on video editors. Sorry I worded it weird, I meant it as I (someone ignorant of editors) couldn’t break it down any better than you described it and exactly how resolve can be to someone ignorant of pro level editors with all the node level editing etc etc...

Im aware of color fast but I do not think color fast can do the same thing as I am describing (completely changing a specific color of a specific item. You would have to make a ton of key points and a bunch of mask to follow the object throughout the video. What I am talking about is at 10:20 where he can isolate the sneakers and completely change the color and it stays on that new item the whole video.

https://youtu.be/BBvEOIozAJk
1jhill
 
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby iNate » Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:54 am

1jhill wrote:
iNate wrote:
1jhill wrote:

This is about the best break down for resolve from a power user/pc builder but complete ignorant on video editing suites as I’ve seen. I fully get the programs potential and spent hours watching YouTube tutorials on how to do stuff and some of its features like the ability to change an items color without effecting any other color in the video is really really cool and I can absolutely see the use for it (like my GoPro always showing bright reds and an orange and I can’t fix it). But in the end the program is just too much for me and my use and just find myself having to watch a tutorial all over again every time I try to use it or do any particular thing because it isn’t something I use daily as a professional would. So that and also the fact it kept bugging out on me on launch led me away from resolve. I didnt know the free version had no hardware decode either which makes sense now why it was choppy as hell for hvec.

1. Ignorant of video editing suites... how?

2. Color grading is one part of DaVinci Resolve... If you don't need the functionality, ignore it? What you're referring to is color correction, which can be accomplished just fine in VideoStudio using NewBlueFX Colorfast. You don't need VideoStudio 2019 to color correct or grade your footage, though the LUT input is nice (but ultimately useless without an intensity slider). Corel has been giving you the tools to do this for years, already. Most color correction plugins are "complicated," as color correction is highly technical. This is why consumer editors often omitted it completely. Consumers don't even have the hardware to accurately color correct, as most consumer desktop monitors and televisions are not color accurate. So, why harp over it? Resolve started off as a color grading solution, and this is why its feature set in that area is very deep... There is a current FAD around LOG footage that is seeping into the consumer market (i.e. Filmic Pro, etc.), which is why you see many people using that to sell it. It's also a bit overhyped because people are perpetually on the anti-Adobe bandwagon ;-)

3. The programs isn't really too much for anyone - no application is. People just feel like they need to learn everything and don't know how to pace the learning curve/process. No one wants to be a newb at anything, Lol. This leaves them feeling overwhelmed. As I've stated earlier... Ignore the functionality you don't need, just as you ignore all the extra plug-ins and applications that Corel gives you with VideoStudio Ultimate... until you need them. At the end of the day, adding Mercalli, ColorFast, Boris and NewBlueFX Titlers, VitaScene, etc. to VideoStudio creates an impressive and very formidable package of functionality with a high combined learning curve. This is only lessened because the functionality is broken up into different distinct products, and it's a lot easier to just ignore the extras, which makes the product seem more approachable. This is why consumer editors put functionality in windows, and not panels! Using Windows means that the application avoids displaying "too much" to the user, which lets it seem approachable, even though the feature set is really quite deep - and it is, even for VideoStudio. Resolve puts all of this functionality in one product, so and exposes a lot more of it up front. That is why it's a daunting product when moving up from something that seems less "complicated". It's not designed for newbies, or at least not those who look at a busy interface and decide it's not worth it :-P

4. Well, they're pretty up front about this. There is a feature comparison PDF and it's linked to from the product page. If you read the documentation, even the basic parts of it, you tend to be informed of these disparities :-P HEVC choppiness is solved by right clicking the clip and Optimizing the Media, which produces quality proxy files that edit with perfect frame accuracy and play back without frame drops (unless your PC is just.... too weak). With smart caching on, Resolve will render cache all of that to an Intermediate Format even without Proxies. Pinnacle Studio also does this! Resolve has one of the best User Manuals/References that I've ever encountered in the software market, and tons of free training material available both in PDF and Video Format, along with Gigabytes of Project Files and Example Media for you to download and follow along with.

The software is only "too much" and "too hard to learn" if you are unwilling to do so, which is your prerogative. Don't sell yourself short, though. They've done as much as anyone ever will to make this as painless and possible for you. It is not difficult.

Crawling around YouTube looking for random tutorials is actually the wrong way to go about it, IMO, given the resources they themselves have provided us.

BTW, nothing in your post displayed how I am "completely ignorant regarding video editing suites." Your first statement is actually a bit of an oxymoron. (You don't have to be a Power User or a PC builder to read and understand system requirements ;-) ).

P.S. HEVC is the absolute worst CODEC to edit directly, along with VP9. A good lesson to learn early is to just... not do it. No matter how many times we tell people to avoid doing it, they persist in doing so... Unfortunately. Transcode. HEVC is a massive waste of computing power that can be better spent on things like effects processing. It's meant for playback, not editing. Trying to do frame-accurate editing with Interframe CODECs is a massive PITA, VFR from smartphones, etc. is a massive PITA even in NLEs that say they are compatible with it. I'm not going to apologize for knowing a little bit more about these things than others. It's your choice whether or not you want to benefit from the knowledge others on this forum share with the community.

Lastly, you CLEARLY didn't read my entire post, because you're basically regurgitating something I've already stated, at the end of it:

Yes, Resolve Free is a thousand times better than VideoStudio… but for many VSP users, it's not a good recommendation. Just because someone games and has a 1080Ti doesn't mean they are ready or willing to deal with Resolve's complexity (or resulting performance limitations, cause it's absolutely tragic with VFR media... like game recordings from OBS and ShadowPlay).

If Resolve is "too much for you," then don't use it. I'm quite aware that it's "too much" for a lot of people, in their opinion. I do think people are a lot more capable than they often give themselves credit for, so I try to provide some motivation for them to push themselves beyond - and extend - their comfort zones.

I'm not really interested in marketing Resolve on this forum, frankly... I've given some reasons why one would want to avoid it in that same post. I simply believe that if you cower away form complexity, then you imprison yourself ever longer in simplicity. Power Users and PC Builders didn't gain literacy with technology by doing that, and I think increasing literacy with technology is within the capability of every human being on this forum.

For some users, VideoStudio is a first step. For others, it's their destination. You get to choose what it will be for yourself. I'm not interested in dictating your software use :-P


You misunderstood what I meant. I didn’t mean you are ignorant of video editors I meant it as comping from me as the ignorant one on video editors. Sorry I worded it weird, I meant it as I (someone ignorant of editors) couldn’t break it down any better than you described it and exactly how resolve can be to someone ignorant of pro level editors with all the node level editing etc etc...

Im aware of color fast but I do not think color fast can do the same thing as I am describing (completely changing a specific color of a specific item. You would have to make a ton of key points and a bunch of mask to follow the object throughout the video. What I am talking about is at 10:20 where he can isolate the sneakers and completely change the color and it stays on that new item the whole video.

https://youtu.be/BBvEOIozAJk

ColorFast can do this, and it isn't that difficult. RTFM applies, here.

If you know so little about these things, why do you argue so much about them with people who do?
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby Desertsweeper » Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:04 pm

Rhopman1986 wrote:Hello,
Like many others I also did receive a couple of upgrade mails for Corel Video Studio 2019. (However none of the new features that Corel is advertising with is something that I need. Especially not for almost the full price)
The only thing that I am wondering:
How is hardware acceleration with rendering and playback in 2019 in comparison with 2018? Is there better support for multi core CPU's and Nvidia GPU's?
I mean, the new AMD and Intel CPU's are now on consumer level and all have 8 cores. Is Corel aware of this?
The problem now is that I have a 9700k CPU , and I barely notice any difference in exporting my video project in comparison with my old 4790k which is 5 years older. (Both were running with the same GTX 1080ti)


On a side-note, I am still unable to use Intel HW Acceleration on my Windows 7 Core i7-7700k with iGPU - both 2018 and 2019 crash when enabled. While I accept that Win7+iGPU+7th-Gen is not supported by anyone officially - it works absolutely fine in Vegas 15 (QSV) and Video Pro X with dramatic improvements in rendering times
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby 1jhill » Tue Feb 19, 2019 12:21 am

https://youtu.be/BBvEOIozAJk[/quote]
ColorFast can do this, and it isn't that difficult. RTFM applies, here.

If you know so little about these things, why do you argue so much about them with people who do?[/quote]i

I think we got off on the wrong foot and somehow I’ve offended you. Sorry I wasn’t trying to argue with you, you clearly know more about video editors than I.

As for colorfast I did use it and used the threshold tool to adjust in the selected color and then change the color but it just didn’t work as well as I thought it should or like the resolve demo, probably just me but by the time I got enough of the color selected it was changing a lot more of the image and still not covering the entire zone of the color needing correction. It just didn’t seem to be able to fine tune it as much.
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Re: Videostudio 2018 VS 2019. How is hardware acceleration?

Postby Rhopman1986 » Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:44 pm

Apparently nobody knows the exact answer on the question how hardware acceleration works exactly in Corel Video Studio regarding CPU cores, so I guess I had just find it out by myself again.

I bought Corel VideoStudio 2019 Ultimate, and perhaps its just me, but I am surprised how smoother it actually feels in comparison with 2018 ultimate.
The playback while editing seems smoother, (I didnt use smart Proxy in both versions) the menus are more responsive to me, and the rendering is a lot faster since I now have to the option to use Intel Quick Sync or Nvidia CUDA when exporting files. It could be me, but I did not saw these options in 2018 ultimate, so I am a bit confused why nobody seems to notice this?

The only bad thing is that Videostudio crashes when using the Nvidia acceleration, but with Quick sync its doing a great job. So yeah, for me editing and rendering is a lot faster now since 2018 ultimate.

<edit>
Oh and of course I used my same system in Corel Ultimate 2018 and 2019.
i7 9700k
16GB DDR4 3200mhz RAM
Nvidia GTX 1080ti 11GB
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